Showing posts with label ted tuesday. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ted tuesday. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

TED Tuesday: Robert Waldinger— What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness

"There isn't time, so brief is life, for bickerings, apologies, heartburnings, callings to account. There is only time for loving, and but an instant, so to speak, for that."







Good Morning Folks,

Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday. The food, family, the stories... always remind me that I have much to be grateful for. Each morning, I'm eager to jump out of bed and get to the office. I'm incredibly fortunate in that I love what I do. My team and I work hard every day to deliver the best opportunities to help you achieve your dreams and ambitions, whatever they may be.

But what else keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.

Join 11 million others to experience my selection for this TED Tuesday, Robert's brilliant TED talk: What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness




As we usher in the "happiest time of the year," I wish you all the health, wealth and happiness that you deserve.


Have a GREAT day, be happy and…


Love Life!


Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer  

*TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design. Since then its scope has become ever broader. Along with two annual conferences -- the TED Conference on the West Coast each spring, and the TEDGlobal conference in Edinburgh UK each summer -- TED includes the award-winning TED Talks video site, the Open Translation Project and TED Conversations, the inspiring TED Fellows and TEDx programs, and the annual TED Prize.  More at TED.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Ted Tuesday: Diana Nyad- "Never Give Up"

"Everyday of our lives is epic....Never ever give up...You can chase your dreams at any age...It looks like the most solitary endeavor in the world and in many ways it is, and in other ways and the most important ways it's a team...When you achieve your dreams, it is not so much what you get, but who you have become..."





Good Morning Folks.

A record-setting long-distance swimmer, Diana Nyad writes and thinks deeply about motivation. If you have a dream, and you have obstacles in front of you, believe in perseverance and find a way!

In the pitch-black night, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, singing to herself, hallucinating … Diana Nyad just kept on swimming. And that's how she finally achieved her lifetime goal as an athlete: an extreme 100-mile swim from Cuba to Florida — at age 64. Hear her story.

For ten years (1969-1979), Diana Nyad was known as the greatest long-distance swimmer in the world. In 1979, she stroked the then-longest swim in history, making the 102.5-mile journey from the island of Bimini (Bahamas) to Florida. She also broke numerous world records, including what had been a 50-year mark for circling Manhattan Island, setting the new time of 7 hrs 57 min. She is a member of the National Women’s Hall of Fame and the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

At age 60, having not swum a stroke in decades, she began planning for her white whale of distance swims: the 110-mile ocean crossing between Cuba and Florida. She'd tried it once, in her 20s, and severe jellyfish attacks had defeated her then. But now, with a strong team and a new commitment to her vision, she stepped back into the salt. She spoke about this second attempt at TEDMED 2011. And at TEDWomen 2013, in December, she talks about how it feels to have finally done it.

“It's the fifth time I stand on this shore, the Cuban shore, looking out at that distant horizon, believing, again, that I'm going to make it all the way across that vast, dangerous wilderness of an ocean. Not only have I tried four times, but the greatest swimmers in the world have been trying since 1950, and it's still never been done.”

Within the first few seconds, and with these few words, Diana Nyad has painted a picture and set a mood about her challenge; to swim from Cuba to Florida. She has also established herself as someone you want to listen to, to trust that she is telling the truth, and to find out what happened. What a powerful start.
Motivation aside, so what can you learn and apply about presentations from Diana Nyad’s TED talk?

==> Show passion.
You can instantly hear the passion in Diane’s voice. As you listen, look away from the screen and just listen for a few moments. You can clearly hear the passion in her cadence, and in her vocal inflections. Notice that she is telling you a story, not reciting a stream of facts or numbers. You hear how meaningful and emotional this journey was. Now think of your own presentations; are you focused on the story, the meaning, or the facts and figures? What would happen if you let a little more passion into these talks?

==> Make it real.
Did you see the sharks? Did you feel the frigid water and experience the solitude of the pitch dark? Did you hear her singing John Lennon's "Imagine" – 200 times? These are not mere details. This is the concrete description that makes her story so tangible. You can't fake this, at least most of us can't. What you can do is go to that place where what you are talking about is real and immediate, and then describe what you are seeing and feeling. (If this is difficult for you, contact me about learning the skills of being in the moment and completely focused.)

==> It's not about your slides.
Did you miss seeing bullet points, charts and graphs, or photos? I don't think you did. In fact, I didn't notice until the end that there nothing but Diana and the world she created verbally. Slides would have been so distracting and even irritating as you wanted to hear this story from her lips. Now, if you don’t want to go completely without slides, at least try to cut back and see what happens. Then cut back some more. Use fewer slides, and put less and less on each one. Or start and end you next talk without slides, using them only as needed.

==> Keep it short.
This talk is about fifteen minutes. She could surely have talked for an hour, or many hours, but she told her story in a compelling way in a fairly short timeframe. Your audience is probably too polite to tell you, but they wish you would be a little more concise. Take out unnecessary "padding." Strip the story down to its basics. Tell enough to make your point. Then end it well.

Make it into a story. Note that Diana takes you from standing on the shore ready to set forth at the beginning, and ends with the crowd cheering and her speaking with reporters at the end. This is classic story style. As a bonus, she added three big takeaways as the final thoughts. Use storytelling structure to make your talks more memorable. And make sure you don't blow off your beginning and endings; these are key targets you must hit.

Take a few pointers from Diana Nyad. Never ever give up. Keep working to make your presentations, speeches and informal talks more concise, compelling and genuine. And, once you get to TED.com, look around. There are many speeches you can learn from, and I will be continuing to write about the ones I think have lessons for us all.

Thanks to Applause Inc for leading me to this which delivered it to you.

Thanks to you for listening.

Have a GREAT Day,



Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer
  


Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  






About FSO Onsite Outsourcing
Recognized on the Inc. 5000 list of the nation's fastest growing companies for the third consecutive year, and lead by industry pioneer, Mitch Weiner, FSO's growth and success can be attributed to making a positive and powerful impact on their clients' bottom lines, as well as their employees' careers and lives.


Tuesday, October 11, 2016

TED Tuesday: It’s Time to Re(IMAGINE) Death

"Miller thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. Take the time to savor this moving talk, which asks big questions about how we think on death and honor life."










Good Morning Folks,

At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? For many, it’s simply comfort, respect, love.

Death is a subject no one likes to talk about. Yet it is one of the only certainties of life. Any of our families could deal with a health crisis, accident or aging parent and find themselves totally unprepared for the decisions they will face. So for that day, and with the goal of using these TED Tuesdays to enrich you both personally and professionally, I share B.J. Miller's "It’s Time to Redesign Death".

Sue Campbell notes, "Miller was a sophomore in college when, horsing around with friends, he climbed onto a parked commuter rail car and was electrocuted. He lost part of one arm and the bottom of both legs as a result. That, he says, was the beginning of his “formal relationship with death.”

Now a physician working at the Zen Hospice guest house in San Francisco, Calif., he focuses on providing palliative care and on fundamentally changing the American health care system. Right now, medical care centers on the disease. Miller argues that it should center on people — what patients want to do and what makes them feel good — taking into account caregivers as helpers and healers.

Miller says “life and health and health care can become about making life more wonderful, rather than just less horrible.”

The video is 20 minutes long and lays out rich ideas. Take the time to savor this moving talk, which asks big questions about how we think on death and honor life:

 

As B.J. says, "I got to redesign my life around this fact, and I tell you it has been a liberation to realize you can always find a shock of beauty or meaning in what life you have left, like that snowball lasting for a perfect moment, all the while melting away. If we love such moments ferociously, then maybe we can learn to live well -- not in spite of death, but because of it. Let death be what takes us, not lack of imagination."

I hope that you learned something new and valuable today from this powerful TED talk on patient-centered compassion. Thanks to Sue Campbell and the Next Avenue Blog for tipping me to this talk.


Have a great day and thanks for being a part of our amazing journey.


Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer  

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
Remember if you are not smiling then you are doing it wrong."
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . 


Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

TED Tuesday: Nilofer Merchant: Got a meeting? Take a Walk

"What you’re doing right now, at this very moment, is killing you.”













Good Morning Folks,

Nilofer Merchant suggests a small idea that just might have a big impact on your life and health: Next time you have a one-on-one meeting, make it into a "walking meeting" — and let ideas flow while you walk and talk. 

Her famed TED Talk, titled, “Got A Meeting? Take A Walk” has been seen online by over two and a half million viewers to date. The talk posits that “sitting is the new smoking,” and encourages sedentary office workers to be both healthy and productive by walking, rather than sitting, at meetings.

This is a short, highly insightful, and relevant talk to those who spend hours on end (no pun intended) at the office. Sitting is serious business, and here’s why you need to know about it. Have a look:


CPC Strategy, commenting on the presentation, noted: meetings on the go are good for 4 main reasons:

1) It’s good for your health. Office dwellers, and many of us are, form a habit of being sedentary week in and week out. Yes, this is American, but clearly not conducive to a healthy, active lifestyle.

2) It generates new ideas. Being stuck in your usual surroundings on a daily basis can really hinder your creativity. You start to get tunnel vision and tend to think more inside the box. The same goes for writing. You have to revisit your work after a couple days break to really look at it from a fresh perspective. If you change your surroundings and your context, you can start to look at things differently.

3) It gets you out of the office. Sort of like #2, but an excuse to get out of the office and stretch your legs is always welcome. We started having our marketing brainstorming meetings outside, and quite simply, it’s a revelation.

4) Speaking of backsides, gentleman, don’t sit on your wallets at work. It’s bad for your spine and refraining from doing so will do wonders for your back

The bottom line, which is, walk and talk. Walk the talk. You'll be surprised at how fresh air drives fresh thinking, and in the way that you do, you'll bring into your life an entirely new set of ideas.

Have a GREAT Day! 

Mitch



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To love without condition, to talk without intention, 
to give without reason and to care without expectation. 
This is the art of true relationship."
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Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

TED Tuesday: Meaghan Ramsey— Why Thinking You're Ugly Is Bad For You

“Let's show our kids the truth. Let's show them that the way you look is just one part of your identity and that the truth is we love them for who they are and what they do and how they make us feel”






Good Morning Folks,

About 10,000 people a month Google the phrase, “Am I ugly?” Meaghan Ramsey of the Dove Self-Esteem Project has a feeling that many of them are young girls. So it's no surprise that today's TED selection has been viewed over 3 million times!

In this deeply unsettling talk, Meaghan walks us through the surprising impacts of low body and image confidence—from lower grade point averages to greater risk-taking with drugs and alcohol. And then shares the key things all of us can do to disrupt this reality.

For you, your kids, or someone you or they may know ... I present:


We strive to have the most inspired, motivated, and best trained employees in the industry! I hope these TED Tuesday presentations keep you well informed and enrich your life both personally and professionally.

Have a GREAT Day! 

Mitch



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“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.” ~~Epicurus
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Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

TED Tuesday: Lidia Yuknavitch— The beauty of being a misfit

"Even at the moment of your failure, you are beautiful. You don't know it yet, but you have the ability to reinvent yourself endlessly. That's your beauty."








Good Morning Folks,

According to IBM, "Every company, every industry, every occupation is undergoing massive change in a global, information economy. To succeed—even survive—in this modern workforce, workers must be adept in more than one subject and keep up with an ever expanding knowledge base that never seems to stop moving. Workers need to be lifelong learners who are comfortable with learning “just in time” rather than “just one time” in life."

At FSO we are constantly learning new things and inspired to want to do more. This is why we cull through hundreds of TED talks each week in order to bring you a valuable and inspirational lesson on Tuesday.

Today's speaker is a self-proclaimed, card-carrying, misfit. In her acclaimed novels and memoir, author Lidia Yuknavitch navigates the intersection of tragedy and violence to draw new roadmaps for self­-discovery.

To those who feel like they don't belong: there is beauty in being a misfit. Author Lidia Yuknavitch shares her own wayward journey in an intimate recollection of patchwork stories about loss, shame and the slow process of self-acceptance. "Even at the moment of your failure, you are beautiful," she says. "You don't know it yet, but you have the ability to reinvent yourself endlessly. That's your beauty."

Lidia discovered her calling after an interrupted journey as a would­-be Olympic swimmer. Her prose erases the boundaries between memoir and fiction, explodes gender binaries and focuses on the visceral minutiae of the body.

Says Lidia, "You can be standing dead center in the middle of your failure and still, I'm only here to tell you, you are so beautiful. Your story deserves to be heard, because you, you rare and phenomenal misfit, you new species, are the only one in the room who can tell the story the way only you would. And I'd be listening."

Have a look:

.

Have a GREAT Day! 

Mitch



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“If a Plant's Roots Are Too Tight, Repot.”
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Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

TED Tuesday: Remembering Scott Dinsmore— How to find and do work you love | TEDxGoldenGatePark (2D)

"But doing the impossible and pushing our limits, because there are 2 reasons why people don’t do things: one is because they tell themselves they can’t do them and the other is people around them tell them, they can’t do. Either way we start to believe it. Either we give up or we never start in the first place."





Good Morning Folks,

Today's speaker, Scott Dinsmore, an Alamo, California native, entrepreneur and adventurer, was killed last year while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, a feat his family says was to fulfill a lifelong dream.

Dinsmore, who was hiking with his wife, died doing what he loved, something he preached through his work, on a blog on his website and in the widely viewed (3+MN) Ted Talk that follows, recorded in 2012.

Before he reached the summit, a cascade of boulders rolled down the mountain and one of them hit and killed the 33-year-old.

In his blog post Scott Dinsmore said he almost decided against booking the Tanzania trip because he didn't think he could go on a digital break.

"How ridiculous is that? To pass up an adventure I've talked about for years -- because I'd convinced myself I couldn't disconnect. Or more truthfully, because I couldn't find the courage to do it. That would have been a tragedy."

Scott Dinsmore quit a job that made him miserable, and spent the next four years wondering how to find work that was joyful and meaningful. He shares what he learned in this deceptively simple talk about finding out what matters to you — and then getting started doing it.

Then Scott made it his mission is to change the world by helping people find what excites them and build a career around the work only they are capable of doing. He is a career change strategist whose demoralizing experience at a Fortune 500 job launched his quest to understand why 80% of adults hate the work they do, and more importantly, to identify what the other 20% were doing differently. His research led to experiences with thousands of employees and entrepreneurs from 158 countries. Scott distilled the results down to his Passionate Work Framework - three surprisingly simple practices for finding and doing work you love, that all happen to be completely within our control. He makes his career tools available free to the public through his community at http://LiveYourLegend.net

What Scott has created at Live Your Legend is mind-boggling. He creates inspiration, the challenge to dream big and bold, and the tools to make all that a reality. But most unbelievable is the community he's developed of people who are passionate about doing something great, and helping each other achieve that. Have a look:




Let me close as Scott did. "And as we finish up, I have just one question to ask you guys, and I think it's the only question that matters. And it's what is the work you can't not do? Discover that, live it, not just for you, but for everybody around you, because that is what starts to change the world. What is the work you can't not."

Have a GREAT Day and Love Life!


Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer



Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE






Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Ted Tuesday: David Steindl-Rast: Want To Be Happy? Be Grateful

"Remember that you deserve to be happy. 
It's your natural-born right."
- Pharrell













Good Morning Folks,

"Happy," originally produced for the Despicable Me 2 soundtrack, topped charts in more than 15 countries for almost two years. It has 900+ Million views on You Tube.

It's impossible not to listen to Pharrell's "Happy" and think about FSO. It could be our anthem. HAPPY IS OUR ENTIRE COMPANY.  As you'll hear in today's program, the only difference between a good day and a bad day is your attitude.

You see, the secret of happiness is like the secret of dieting: There is no secret.

We all want to be happy, says David Steindl-Rast, a Benedictine monk and today's Ted Tuesday speaker with over FIVE MILLION views on Ted and YouTube (just in case you are wondering who ever heard of him or whether it's worth your few minutes to tune in).

Everyone wants to be happy. But not all happy people are grateful (they want more of something, or want something else); but all grateful people (even though many live with misfortune) are happy.

So: it’s not happiness that makes us grateful, but gratefulness that makes us happy.

Every moment is a gift, and ‘opportunity’ is the gift within every gift.

The master key to happiness? Moment by moment we have this gift.

In some moments we’re not happy – because of someone’s suffering, loss of a friend, etc.

But the key here is that we’re learning something in every moment: patience, for example. And then in the next moment we get another opportunity.

How should we respond to all these opportunities? Same as you were taught as a child about crossing the street: STOP, LOOK, GO.

STOP when you turn on the water-faucet: millions don’t have access to drinkable water. Or ditto when you turn on the power switch. (David’s put little ‘gratefulness stickers’ on the tap and light-switch at his place, after a trip to Africa where these good things weren’t available.)

LOOK – open your eyes, and your hearts (use the opportunity to make others happy).

GO – Do something!

Grateful people are not fearful, and therefore not violent. Grateful people are joyful people.

Grateful people are FSO people and I am honored to be in your company.

May love, health, joy and laughter continue throughout your  life.

Now discover why happiness, as David suggests, is born from gratitude. 

Get ready for an inspiring lesson in slowing down, looking where you're going, and above all, being grateful.




Thanks to John Mark Ministries and Ted for making it possible to share this with you, and to you for watching. 

Let’s FOCUS on today, so we can build tomorrow.

Have a GREAT day as I look forward to seeing all of you soon.









Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer


Learn more about what DIFFERENTIATES FSO here

Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE


Tuesday, July 19, 2016

TED Tuesday— Clay Shirky: Institutions vs. Collaboration

“Amazing video - 20 min accelerating your creativity, and understanding the world.“












Good Morning Folks,

If you're a massive TED fan like me, you've probably watched a whole lot of the compelling talks by now. But when it comes to consuming all the insights TED has to offer, even the most dedicated enthusiasts can't hold a candle to Chris Anderson.

As the curator of TED, he's had a front row seat for nearly every presentation or performance that's graced the event's stage. Which is what makes his answer to a recent Quora member who asked "What  is the top TED talk that you took away the most learnings from?"

This all time TED classic was his #1 choice.

In this prescient 2005 talk, Clay Shirky shows how closed groups and companies will give way to looser networks where small contributors have big roles and fluid cooperation replaces rigid planning. Shirky is an adjunct professor in New York Universityʼs graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program, where he teaches a course named “Social Weather.” Heʼs the author of several books. This spring at the TED headquarters in New York, he gave an impassioned talk against SOPA/PIPA that saw 1 million views in 48 hours. He's become a consistently prescient voice on networks, social software, and technology's effects on society.

Clay Shirky argues that the history of the modern world could be rendered as the history of ways of arguing, where changes in media change what sort of arguments are possible — with deep social and political implications. Have a look:


Growing a network is always good, because multiplies the brain power on any topic--being in the network helps you get the questions out to the experts and from there, the answers and ideas just begin to flow.

Watching these TED videos seems to build my creativity... Even though most of the videos have nothing to do with what we do. Incredible.

Have a GREAT Day! 

 Mitch


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"The best way to sell yourself to others is first to sell the others to yourself."
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Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  



About FSO Onsite Outsourcing
Recognized on the Inc. 5000 list of the nation's fastest growing companies for the fourth consecutive year, and lead by industry pioneer, Mitch Weiner, FSO's growth and success can be attributed to making a positive and powerful impact on their clients' bottom lines, as well as their employees' careers and lives.







Tuesday, July 12, 2016

TED Tuesday— Nancy Etcoff: Happiness and its surprises

"We are wired to pursue happiness, not only to enjoy it, but to want more and more of it."









Good Morning Folks,

At FSO we are constantly learning new things and inspired to want to be better at everything we do. That's why every Tuesday I present some of the best and most popular TED talks on the planet.

Today, cognitive researcher Nancy Etcoff looks at happiness — the ways we try to achieve and increase it, the way it's untethered to our real circumstances, and its surprising effect on our bodies. This Harvard psychologist argues that we ogle such features because they radiate the health and fertility our species needs to survive. Have a look:


In her book Survival of the Prettiest, Nancy Etcoff refutes the social origins of beauty, in favor of far more prosaic and evolutionary explanations. Looking for a partner with clear skin? You're actually checking for parasites. And let's just say there's a reason high heels are always in fashion.

Her recent research into the question of happiness exposes results that not only are surprising but reinforce things we should've known all along: like the fact that having flowers in the house really does make us happier. As the instructor of "The Science of Happiness" at Harvard Medical School and the director of the Program in Aesthetics and Well Being at Massachusetts General Hospital, Nancy Etcoff is uniquely qualified to solve the mysteries of contentment.

Have a GREAT Day! 

 Mitch

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"Begin by always expecting good things to happen.”
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Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  



About FSO Onsite Outsourcing
Recognized on the Inc. 5000 list of the nation's fastest growing companies for the fourth consecutive year, and lead by industry pioneer, Mitch Weiner, FSO's growth and success can be attributed to making a positive and powerful impact on their clients' bottom lines, as well as their employees' careers and lives.





Tuesday, June 28, 2016

TED Tuesday- Judson Brewer: A simple way to break a bad habit

Can we break bad habits by being more curious about them? Psychiatrist Judson Brewer studies the relationship between mindfulness and addiction — from smoking to overeating to all those other things we do even though we know they're bad for us. 


Learn more about the mechanism of habit development and discover a simple but profound tactic that might help you beat your next urge to smoke, snack or check a text while driving. 


Have a GREAT Day! 

 Mitch

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"Leaders can let you fail and yet not let you be a failure."
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Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on MitchWeiner.com highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  



About FSO Onsite Outsourcing
Recognized on the Inc. 5000 list of the nation's fastest growing companies for the fourth consecutive year, and lead by industry pioneer, Mitch Weiner, FSO's growth and success can be attributed to making a positive and powerful impact on their clients' bottom lines, as well as their employees' careers and lives.


Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Ted Tuesday: The Key to Success: Grit

Grit is sticking with your future — day in, day out, not just for the week, not just for the month, but for years — and working really hard to make that future a reality.”

















Good Morning Folks,

Every Tuesday we bring you one of my favorite TED talks. TED.com is a treasure trove of inspiration, and I promise you whenever you are feeling down, you can go there and find a few smart words that will cheer you right up.

Today though the message is "Never give up! It's more than just a platitude.

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success.

Assistant professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, Angela Lee Duckworth studies intangible concepts such as self-control and grit to determine how they might predict both academic and professional success.

In her extensive research, psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth found that more than IQ or talent or any other factor, the #1 predictor of a person's success is their unflagging commitment to a long-term goal... in other words, their grit.

Find out why... WATCH: The Surprising Trait That's MUCH More Important Than IQ

Have a GREAT day. Love LIFE!








Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer

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“The secret to happiness is low expectations.” 

— Barry Schwartz 
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About the Author:
Welcome to the fastest growing onsite outsourcing company in the nation! Led by Mitch Weiner, co-founder and industry pioneer, FSO is "the" award winning enterprise-wide outsourcing and people solutions firm servicing a multitude of clients across North America.

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