Showing posts with label happiness. Show all posts
Showing posts with label happiness. Show all posts

Monday, February 22, 2016

Enjoying Life: Habits of Happy People

“Happiness is a habit – cultivate it.” 
~~ Elbert Hubbard

Good Morning Folks,

I’d like to share this uplifting piece I found on years ago and, as your Chief Happiness Officer,  have always referred back to for inspiration since.

Happiness is one aspiration all people share. No one wants to be sad and depressed.

We’ve all seen people who are always happy – even amidst agonizing life trials. I’m not saying happy people don’t feel grief, sorrow or sadness; they just don’t let it overtake their life. The following are 21 things happy people make a habit of doing:

==>Appreciate Life
Be thankful that you woke up alive each morning. Develop a childlike sense of wonder towards life. Focus on the beauty of every living thing. Make the most of each day. Don’t take anything for granted. Don’t sweat the small stuff.

==>Choose Friends Wisely
Surround yourself with happy, positive people who share your values and goals. Friends that have the same ethics as you will encourage you to achieve your dreams. They help you to feel good about yourself. They are there to lend a helping hand when needed.

==>Be Considerate
Accept others for who they are as well as where they are in life. Respect them for who they are. Touch them with a kind and generous spirit. Help when you are able, without trying to change the other person. Try to brighten the day of everyone you come into contact with.

==>Learn Continuously
Keep up to date with the latest news regarding your career and hobbies. Try new and daring things that has sparked your interest – such as dancing, skiing, surfing or sky-diving.

==>Creative Problem Solving
Don’t wallow in self-pity. As soon as you face a challenge get busy finding a solution. Don’t let the set backs affect your mood, instead see each new obstacle you face as an opportunity to make a positive change. Learn to trust your gut instincts – it’s almost always right.

==>Do What They Love
Some statistics show that 80% of people dislike their jobs! No wonder there’s so many unhappy people running around. We spend a great deal of our life working. Choose a career that you enjoy – the extra money of a job you detest isn’t worth it. Make time to enjoy your hobbies and pursue special interests.

==>Enjoy Life
Take the time to see the beauty around you. There’s more to life than work. Take time to smell the roses, watch a sunset or sunrise with a loved one, take a walk along the seashore, hike in the woods etc. Learn to live in the present moment and cherish it. Don’t live in the past or the future.

Don’t take yourself – or life to seriously. You can find humor in just about any situation. Laugh at yourself – no one’s perfect. When appropriate laugh and make light of the circumstances. (Naturally there are times that you should be serious as it would be improper to laugh.)

Holding a grudge will hurt no one but you. Forgive others for your own peace of mind. When you make a mistake – own up to it – learn from it – and FORGIVE yourself.

Develop an attitude of gratitude. Count your blessings; All of them – even the things that seem trivial. Be grateful for your home, your work and most importantly your family and friends. Take the time to tell them that you are happy they are in your life.

==>Invest in Relationships
Always make sure your loved ones know you love them even in times of conflict. Nurture and grow your relationships with your family and friends by making the time to spend with them. Don’t break your promises to them. Be supportive.

==>Keep Their Word
Honesty is the best policy. Every action and decision you make should be based on honesty. Be honest with yourself and with your loved ones.

==>Mind Their Own Business
Concentrate on creating your life the way you want it. Take care of you and your family. Don’t get overly concerned with what other people are doing or saying. Don’t get caught up with gossip or name calling. Don’t judge. Everyone has a right to live their own life the way they want to – including you.

See the glass as half full. Find the positive side of any given situation. It’s there – even though it may be hard to find. Know that everything happens for a reason, even though you may never know what the reason is. Steer clear of negative thoughts. If a negative thought creeps in – replace it with a positive thought.

==>Love Unconditionally
Accept others for who they are. You don’t put limitations on your love. Even though you may not always like the actions of your loved ones – you continue to love them.

Never give up. Face each new challenge with the attitude that it will bring you one step closer to your goal. You will never fail, as long as you never give up. Focus on what you want, learn the required skills, make a plan to succeed and take action. We are always happiest while pursuing something of value to us.

==>Be Proactive
Accept what can not be changed. Happy people don’t waste energy on circumstances beyond their control. Accept your limitations as a human being. Determine how you can take control by creating the outcome you desire – rather than waiting to respond.

==>Self Care
Take care of your mind, body and health. Get regular medical check ups. Eat healthy and work out. Get plenty of rest. Drink lots of water. Exercise your mind by continually energizing it with interesting and exciting challenges.

==>Self Confidence
Don’t try to be someone that you’re not. After all no one likes a phony. Determine who you are in the inside – your own personal likes and dislikes. Be confident in who you are. Do the best you can and don’t second guess yourself.

==>Take Responsibility
Happy people know and understand that they are 100% responsible for their life. They take responsibility for their moods, attitude, thoughts, feelings, actions and words. They are the first to admit when they’ve made a mistake.

Begin today by taking responsibility for your happiness. Work on developing these habits as you own. The more you incorporate the above habits into your daily lifestyle – the happier you will be.


Have a great day and thanks for being a part of our amazing journey.

Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer  

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 “You just can’t beat the person who never gives up"
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Monday, January 11, 2016

Great Customer Service Builds Brands And Loyalty

"Every customer contacts us at least once sometime during his or her lifetime, and we just need to make sure that we use that opportunity to create a lasting memory." 
~~ Tony Hsieh, CEO of

Good Morning Folks, 

Ken Blanchard, coauthor of Raving Fans: A Revolutionary Approach to Customer Service, introduces a passage about how great customer service builds brands and loyalty from Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose, by Tony Hsieh (the world's best-known Chief Happiness Officer).

To keep your customers today, you can’t be content just to satisfy them. If you want your business to thrive, you have to create what I call Raving Fans — customers who are so excited about the way you treat them that they want to tell stories about you. These customers become part of your sales force.

Great service is not an accident. It starts when you decide what kind of experience you want your customers to have — when you articulate a clear vision. You keep it alive by empowering your people to go the extra mile for the customer. When it’s innovative and comes from the heart, great service keeps customers coming back again and again.

Tony Hsieh, CEO of, understands what great customer service — or, as they call it at Zappos, WOW service — is all about. Once you read the following excerpt, you’ll understand two things. First, you’ll figure out why Zappos quickly became the biggest online shoe store. Second, you’ll know the company is not exaggerating in calling it WOW service.

— Ken Blanchard

Excerpted from Chapter 5 of Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose by Tony Hsieh, CEO of
We receive thousands and thousands of phone calls and e-mails every single day, and we really view each contact as an opportunity to build the Zappos brand into being about the very best customer service and customer experience. Looking at every interaction through a branding lens instead of an expense-minimization lens means we run our call center very differently from most call centers. 
Most call centers measure their employees’ performance based on what’s known in the industry as “average handle time,” which focuses on how many phone calls each rep can take in a day. This translates into reps worrying about how quickly they can get a customer off the phone, which in our eyes is not delivering great customer service. Most call centers also have scripts and force their reps to try to upsell customers to generate additional revenue. 
At Zappos, we don’t measure call times (our longest phone call was almost six hours long!), and we don’t upsell. We just care about whether the rep goes above and beyond for every customer. We don’t have scripts because we trust our employees to use their best judgment when dealing with each and every customer. We want our reps to let their true personalities shine during each phone call so that they can develop a personal emotional connection (internally referred to as PEC) with the customer. 
Another example of us using the telephone as a branding device is what happens when a customer calls looking for a specific style of shoes in a specific size that we’re out of stock on. In those instances, every rep is trained to research at least three competitors’ Web sites, and if the shoe is found in stock to direct the customer to the competitor. Obviously, in those situations, we lose the sale. But we’re not trying to maximize each and every transaction. Instead, we’re trying to build a lifelong relationship with each customer, one phone call at a time. 
A lot of people may think it’s strange that an Internet company is so focused on the telephone, when only about 5 percent of our sales happen through the telephone. In fact, most of our phone calls don’t even result in sales. But what we’ve found is that on average, every customer contacts us at least once sometime during his or her lifetime, and we just need to make sure that we use that opportunity to create a lasting memory. 
The majority of phone calls don’t result in an immediate order. Sometimes a customer may be calling because it’s her first time going through the returns process, and she just wants a little help stepping through the process. Other times, a customer may call because there’s a wedding coming up this weekend and he just wants a little fashion advice. And sometimes, we get customers who call simply because they’re a little lonely and want someone to talk to. 
I’m reminded of a time when I was in Santa Monica, California, a few years ago at a Skechers sales conference. After a long night of bar-hopping, a small group of us headed up to someone’s hotel room to order some food. My friend from Skechers tried to order a pepperoni pizza from the room-service menu, but was disappointed to learn that the hotel we were staying at did not deliver hot food after 11:00 pm. We had missed the deadline by several hours. 
In our inebriated state, a few of us cajoled her into calling Zappos to try to order a pizza. She took us up on our dare, turned on the speakerphone, and explained to the (very) patient Zappos rep that she was staying in a Santa Monica hotel and really craving a pepperoni pizza, that room service was no longer delivering hot food, and that she wanted to know if there was anything Zappos could do to help. 
The Zappos rep initially was a bit confused by the request, but she quickly recovered and put us on hold. She returned two minutes later, listing the five closest places in the Santa Monica area that were still open and delivering pizzas at that time. 
Now, truth be told, I was a little hesitant to include this story because I don’t actually want everyone who reads this book to start calling Zappos and ordering pizza. But I just think it’s a fun story to illustrate the power of not having scripts in your call center and empowering your employees to do what’s right for your brand, no matter how unusual or bizarre the situation. 
As for my friend from Skechers? After that phone call, she’s now a customer for life. — Tony Hsieh
Make this week a REIMAGINE WEEK. To our employees: I'll see you at YOUR awards Wednesday night. 

Have a GREAT day,

Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer

"The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary."

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

TED Tuesday: Tali Sharot- The Optimism Bias

In the talk Tali shows a cartoon and speaks about a Penguin in a way that meshes perfectly with our own (re)IMAGINE theme. She notes, "Because if you're one of these pessimistic penguins up there who just does not believe they can fly, you certainly never will. Because to make any kind of progress, we need to be able to imagine a different reality, and then we need to believe that that reality is possible."

Good Morning Folks,

What a great way to start of 2016 then commit to look at things through a more optimistic lenses!

Are we born to be optimistic, rather than realistic? Tali Sharot shares new research that suggests our brains are wired to look on the bright side — and how that can be both dangerous and beneficial. While the past few years have seen important advances in the neuroscience of optimism, one enduring puzzle remained. How is it that people maintain this rosy bias even when information challenging our upbeat forecasts is so readily available?

Optimism bias is a tendency to overestimate the likelihood of good things happening to you, and underestimating bad things. For example 40% of people divorce, but people marrying assume the probability for them is zero. Even people marrying for a second time don’t see it: “Remarrying is the triumph of hope over experience”. People tend to be optimistic about themselves and their family, while at the same time predicting a bad future for the world in general.

Optimism about your own traits gives you a confidence and sets you up for success. But are low expectations the secret to happiness? This will mean you will be happy with success in love and career, but are not disappointed if it doesn’t happen. Our speaker today, with almost 10 million views of this program racked up between YouTube and on TED, is the author of author of The Optimism Bias and a research fellow at University College London's Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging. She argues the opposite, that optimistic people are happier because:
  • Optimists interpret things differently. Whether they win or lose, they interpret successes as due to their own traits and failures as poor luck or biases.
  • Anticipation makes people happy – something pleasant (a kiss from a celebrity) immediately isn’t as enjoyable as one in 3 days time – which lets you look forward to it
  • Optimism acts as a self-fulfilling prophecy – it makes you try harder to achieve your goals. Optimism leads to success.
So how do we maintain optimism in the face of reality? That is: stay optimistic despite evidence to the contrary. Tali did a study – asking people to estimate their cancer risk (for example), then giving the population rate (30%) and asking them again their likelihood. People did change their estimate, but they changed it a lot more if their first estimate was high (i.e. changing their estimate from 50% to 35%) rather than when it was low (going from 10% to 11%). Tali found that there were 2 regions of the brain: one responsible for receiving good news and one that processes bad news. The ‘bad news region’ did not trigger in optimistic people: they kept the rose tinted spectacles on.

On average, we expect things to turn out better than they wind up being. People hugely underestimate their chances of getting divorced, losing their job or being diagnosed with cancer; expect their children to be extraordinarily gifted; envision themselves achieving more than their peers; and overestimate their likely life span (sometimes by 20 years or more).

The belief that the future will be much better than the past and present is known as the optimism bias. It abides in every race, region and socioeconomic bracket. Schoolchildren playing when-I-grow-up are rampant optimists, but so are grown-ups: a 2005 study found that adults over 60 are just as likely to see the glass half full as young adults.

A cancelled flight is hardly tragic, but even when the incidents that befall us are the type of horrific events we never expected to encounter, we automatically seek evidence confirming that our misfortune is a blessing in disguise. No, we did not anticipate losing our job, being ill or getting a divorce, but when these incidents occur, we search for the upside. These experiences mature us, we think. They may lead to more fulfilling jobs and stable relationships in the future. Interpreting a misfortune in this way allows us to conclude that our sunny expectations were correct after all – things did work out for the best.

In the talk Tali shows a cartoon and speaks about a Penguin in a way that meshes perfectly with our own (re)IMAGINE theme. She notes, "Because if you're one of these pessimistic penguins up there who just does not believe they can fly, you certainly never will. Because to make any kind of progress, we need to be able to imagine a different reality, and then we need to believe that that reality is possible. But if you are an extreme optimistic penguin who just jumps down blindly hoping for the best, you might find yourself in a bit of a mess when you hit the ground. But if you're an optimistic penguin who believes they can fly, but then adjusts a parachute to your back just in case things don't work out exactly as you had planned, you will soar like an eagle, even if you're just a penguin."

Have a look...

Thanks to The Guardian and TedSummaries for inspiring me today and to you, for listening.


Love Life,

Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer  

Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form.TED Tuesdays on highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Throw Back Thursday: Everybody Leads; Everybody Cares

"Likewise, inspire and encourage your teams, “honk” by recognizing and rewarding an employee with a pat on the back, a kudo, a special mention during the daily huddle, it will go a long way to making everyone feel appreciated as well as promote camaraderie and teamwork."

Good Morning Folks,

Whether you have heard this tale before, or are taking it on for the first time, today's "TBT" post will always lift you up.

There was a time when the lone eagle on the mountain was a popular symbol for leadership.  But in a fast-moving organization such as FSO, we should have – MUST HAVE – leaders at EVERY position.  If you want a better metaphor than the eagle, consider the wild and wily Great Northern Geese.


A flock of Great Northern Geese will fly thousands of miles in a perfect V formation – and therein lies the secret: As each bird moves its great wings, it creates an uplift for the bird following.  Formation flying is 70 percent more efficient than flying alone.  If every associate at every site is aligned and FOCUSED  on delivering the hospitality experience, we will create an uplift for each other to continue delivering white glove service as a unit.


At a distance, the flock appears to be guided by a single leader.  The lead bird does in fact guide the formation, winging smoothly and confidently through the oncoming elements.  If the lead bird tires, however, it rotates back into formation and another bird moves quickly to the point position.  Leadership is willingly shared, and each bird knows exactly where the entire group is headed.  At FSO, every associate knows where we are headed and can see 2020 clearly.  Each one of our teammates should be able to wing smoothly and confidently through any and all challenges they may face on a daily basis.


Each flock finds its own unique rhythm and spirit.  The pulsating sound of the huge wings beating together excites and energizes the entire formation.  The geese enthusiastically honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up with their speed.  Likewise, inspire and encourage your teams, “honk” by recognizing and rewarding an employee with a pat on the back, a kudo, a special mention during the daily huddle, it will go a long way to making everyone feel appreciated as well as promote camaraderie and teamwork.


In good time or bad, Great Northern Geese stand by each other.  When a member of the flock gets sick, wounded or shot down, two geese drop out of formation and follow it down to help and protect it.  They stay with it until it is able to fly again.  Then they soar off together to catch up with their flock.  Know that you have easy access to an entire NATION of counterparts that can support you and guide you at any time…  all you have to do is reach out and they will help and support you to soar along with the rest, the best, FSO.

If WE have as much sense as geese, we TOO will share the leadership and stand by each other in difficult times as well as when we are strong.

What a terrific, informative and timely message for all of us at FSO. Absolutely loved the message of unity, leadership and teamwork and I am always amazed how much we can learn from one of God's creatures.

In the spirit of the season.... CHEERS!

Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer

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"If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more,
do more and become more, you are a leader." 
~~John Quincy Adams
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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

TED Tuesday: Lorrie Faith Cranor- What’s wrong with your pa$$w0rd?

"So passwords are something that I hear a lot about. A lot of people are frustrated with passwords, and it's bad enough when you have to have one really good password that you can remember but nobody else is going to be able to guess. But what do you do when you have accounts on a hundred different systems and you're supposed to have a unique password for each of these systems? It's tough."

Good Morning Folks,

Abner Goodwin's job title is Systems Specialist so like most IT people he should know best about security right? We'll even some folks in IT can procrastinate changing their passwords longer than filing their income tax. So don't feel bad, but use today's talk to set your browsing on a more secure path.

Abner blogs, "I’ve been an Internet user for about half my life now. That’s been enough time to collect many, many accounts. I have at least 3 email accounts, accounts on the usual social networking sites, and a slew of random accounts for online stores and services. I figure that I have somewhere around 30 personal accounts that I’ve set up over the years. There are many others that I’ve lost track of, consigned to the briny depths of the web to be forever forgotten."

"It’s time for a confession dear readers: I have committed a grievous evil. I have re-used passwords for multiple personal accounts with wild abandon. On top of that, before this article, I had not changed passwords on some accounts for years. What’s worse is I know better than this; I follow best practices for passwords in my professional life obsessively. Seriously, there was an intervention and everything. I guess it would be at this point where I’d say something about the cobbler’s son having no shoes."

"This was pretty much the extent of my super sophisticated personal password scheme. Luckily, I kept the post-it note under my keyboard where no one would ever find it."

"Continuing down this cliche’d path, I’ve heard that people don’t change until the pain of staying the same is greater than the pain of changing. For me, the pain came just a few days ago when I received an email from a forum that I belong to. The email stated that they’d been compromised and that the attacker had gained access to their database of usernames and encrypted passwords."

Lorrie Faith Cranor is a Professor of Computer Science and of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University where she is director of the CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory (CUPS) and co-director of the MSIT-Privacy Engineering masters program. She is also a co-founder of Wombat Security Technologies, Inc. She has authored over 100 research papers on online privacy, usable security, and other topics

Lorrie Faith Cranor studied thousands of real passwords to figure out the surprising, very common mistakes that users — and secured sites — make to compromise security. And how, you may ask, did she study thousands of real passwords without compromising the security of any users? That's a story in itself. It's secret data worth knowing, especially if your password is 123456 ...

I found this video on some research Lorrie is doing on the subject very interesting and insightful

Says Lorrie:

 "I always cringe whenever people talk about choosing passwords, but this has some interesting insights into the strengths and weaknesses of various techniques, and it even mentions some I've not heard of before." 
e’ve all heard the common password advice: Choose a random password with a lot of characters, include digits and symbols, don’t use a dictionary word, don’t write it down and change it often. While some of this advice is useful, some of it is counterproductive and probably even harmful. 
Next Friday I will be giving a Game Changer talk at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in which I will discuss research results—from my own research group at Carnegie Mellon University as well as from others—that demonstrates that what most people thought they knew about passwords is wrong. 
Most humans are not very good at memorizing random things, and they don’t enjoy doing it. While we are impressed by the talent of spelling bee champions, most of us would rather not spend our time on rote memorization. 
It turns out we’re also not very good at coming up with random things, let alone memorizing them. We like to think of ourselves as unique, but we actually think alike more than we want to admit, and we tend to be rather predictable. 
So, when we’re asked to come up with a random password, we do something that seems random to us but is actually what a lot of other people do. We think of some song lyrics, the name of our pet, a cartoon character, a TV show, a sports team or even the name of a friend or family member. Or maybe we trace our fingers on a keyboard and type in a sequence of keys that appear next to each other—maybe diagonally down one column and then up the next, because that seems more random than just going left to right across. If we have to add a symbol, we type an exclamation point at the end. If we have to add a number, it is most likely a 1. And if a capital letter is needed, it goes at the beginning. 
And because this was so much work to not only choose, but to remember, and because we know we’re not supposed to write our passwords down, the next time we have to create a password, we just use the same one we already created.
But what happens when you log in and are told that your password has expired and you have to choose a new one? Chances are you increment the 1 to a 2 or add another exclamation point to the end."
Research shows that forcing users to change their password on a regular basis does not actually increase security. In fact, it encourages users to create weaker passwords and increment them according to a predictable scheme. So, not only does password expiration annoy users, it likely makes their passwords more vulnerable to attack. Have a look:

Here are a few highlights of Lorrie's talk:

  • Long passwords with simple requirements can be easier to use and just as strong as shorter passwords with complex requirements.
  • Password meters can encourage users to create stronger passwords, but most password meters used on websites today provide positive feedback prematurely.
  • Passphrases seem like a good idea, but users don’t find random passphrases more usable than passwords.
  • Monkey is the most popular animal to include in a password and among the most popular words to include in a password.
So it seems that at the end of the day, when we make passwords, we either make something that's really easy to type, a common pattern, or things that remind us of the word password or the account that we've created the password for, or whatever. Or we think about things that make us happy, and we create our password based on things that make us happy. And while this makes typing and remembering your password more fun, it also makes it a lot easier to guess your password. So I know a lot of these TED Talks are inspirational and they make you think about nice, happy things, but when you're creating your password, try to think about something else.

Have a GREAT Day,

Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer

"The privilege of a lifetime is to become who you truly are."
 ~ Carl Jung

Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TED Tuesdays on highlights some of today's most intriguing ideas. Look for more talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more— HERE.  

About FSO Onsite Outsourcing
Recognized on the Inc. 5000 list of the nation's fastest growing companies for the third consecutive year, and lead by industry pioneer, Mitch Weiner, FSO's growth and success can be attributed to making a positive and powerful impact on their clients' bottom lines, as well as their employees' careers and lives.

About Lorrie Faith Cranor

Lorrie Faith Cranor is a Professor of Computer Science and of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University where she is director of the CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory (CUPS) and co-director of the MSIT-Privacy Engineering masters program. She is also a co-founder of Wombat Security Technologies, Inc. She has authored over 100 research papers on online privacy, usable security, and other topics. She has played a key role in building the usable privacy and security research community, having co-edited the seminal book Security and Usability (O'Reilly 2005) and founded the Symposium On Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS). She also chaired the Platform for Privacy Preferences Project (P3P) Specification Working Group at the W3C and authored the book Web Privacy with P3P (O'Reilly 2002). She has served on a number of boards, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation Board of Directors, and on the editorial boards of several journals. In 2003 she was named one of the top 100 innovators 35 or younger by Technology Review magazine. She was previously a researcher at AT&T-Labs Research and taught in the Stern School of Business at New York University. In 2012-13 she spent her sabbatical year as a fellow in the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon University where she worked on fiber arts projects that combined her interests in privacy and security, quilting, computers, and technology. She practices yoga, plays soccer, and runs after her three children.

Friday, November 13, 2015

Inspire ME Friday ==> 8 Ways To Keep Your Boss Happy

"Regardless of what it says on your job description, your real job is to make your boss successful. There are no exceptions to this rule. None. And,by the way: Your boss's real job is to make you more successful. The reversal of these priorities is the source of almost all organizational problems."

Good Morning Folks,

Welcome to Friday the 13th!

From Geoffrey James (The Sales Guy), here are the rules for keeping your boss happy:

1. Be true to your word.
Your boss wants to trust you. Really.  Therefore, whenever you accept an assignment, follow through religiously, even fanatically. Do what you say you're going to do. Never over commit, and avoid hedging your bets with vague statements like "I'll try" and "maybe." Instead, make your word carry real weight.

2. No surprises, ever.
The secret fear of every boss is that employees are screwing up but are not saying anything about it.  So even if you're afraid some bad news might upset your boss, make sure he's informed. Note: If your boss consistently "shoots the messenger," you can ignore this rule-because his behavior shows he doesn't really want to be in the know.

3. Be prepared on the details.
Your boss wants to believe you're competent and on top of things.  That's why she sometimes picks an aspect of your job and begins randomly asking penetrating questions. Therefore, whenever you're meeting with the boss, have the details ready so you can answer these queries with grace and aplomb.

4. Take your job seriously.
Bosses appreciate individuals who truly care about what they do and willing to take the time to achieve a deep understanding of their craft. Bosses need people who have unique expertise. You don't have to be a pro at everything, but you should definitely have a specific area of knowledge that your boss values.

5. Have your boss's back.
When you see your boss about to make a foolish decision, it's your responsibility to attempt to convince him to make a different one. Make your best case, and express yourself clearly. However, once the decision is actually made, do your best to make it work-regardless of whether you think it was the right one.

6. Provide solutions, not complaints.
Complainers are the bane of your boss's existence. Nothing is more irritating or more boring than listening to somebody kvetch about things that they're not willing to change.  So never bring up a problem unless you've got a solution to propose-or are willing to take the advice the boss gives you.

7. Communicate in plain language.
Bosses are busy people and have neither the time nor the inclination to wade through piles of biz-blab, jargon and weasel words. When dealing with your boss, speak and write in short sentences, use the fewest words possible to make a point, and make that point clear and easily understandable.

8. Know your real job.
Regardless of what it says on your job description, your real job is to make your boss successful. There are no exceptions to this rule. None.

And,by the way: Your boss's real job is to make you more successful. The reversal of these priorities is the source of almost all organizational problems.

Have a GREAT day and enjoy this beautiful fall weekend!

Be great and (re)IMAGINE!

Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer  

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"To dare is to lose one's footing momentarily. To not dare is to lose oneself." 
~~ Soren Kierkegaard
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Monday, November 2, 2015

Only 51 More Days Till The Happiest Time of The Year... Unless...

Photo: BitterSweetColours
"There'll be parties for hosting
Marshmallows for toasting
And caroling out in the snow
There'll be scary ghost stories
And tales of the glories
Of Christmases long, long ago
It's the most wonderful time of the year"

Good Morning Folks,

It's love at first chill with Christmas already in the air. 

New York City is always great but I think it's magical on Christmas! It's bustling with so much energy and life. Everyone is walking briskly, smiling, saying hello, preparing to tip and thank the service people who support and make possible the great lives they enjoy in a very special place.

Such expressions of gratitude are an emotion so powerful it can transform ones mood from darkness to healing light and renew our zest for life.

Being grateful is an attitude of deep appreciation for the realities that surround us "moment to moment"...each day of our life.

But you don 't have to wait for Christmas to be happy. If you are stuck in a dead end job or responsible for back office support and get greeted in the morning by the Debbie Downer receptionist face, find deadlines unmet, critical support staff calling in sick, criticism rather than compliments from the boss, voice mail loops and layers of management bureaucracy instead of answers, FSO can change your destiny. Because happiness lives, breathes and starts everyday with you smiling right here. 

FSO is driven by passionate people and the value they create. They are passionate about their work. Their passion and enthusiasm are the fuel that ignites our success. If there's one thing that FSO lives and breathes everyday – it's the employee experience. We focus on motivating and driving the hourly employee to deliver great service with a skip to their step, twinkle in the eye and fire in the belly.

Growing our folks is my legacy. My care. And my passion. 

Such happiness is contagious –– when the boss has it, it trickles down throughout the entire organization and beyond to its clients. Happiness can spread to everyone who has a dream, a goal, and the will to change. Happiness can elevate and inspire people to make real and lasting changes in their own lives. Today, an enormous opportunity exists to (re) imagine and reinvigorate your workplace and workforce with FSO.

Clients like to think of FSO as the Ritz Carlton of the outsourcing business. Our team takes great pride in all that we do for you. We're all about making the Hospitality service, a pleasant and seamless experience, every single day. Whenever, wherever and however, our Team we'll always be there. 

We continually strive to go "above and beyond" with our clients to provide the most enjoyable experience with the finest personal service and facilities and fulfilling even the unexpressed wishes and needs.

And we always deliver the rare, exceptional level of service that is really worthy of your gratitude. Unlike those Christmas envelopes you'll soon be delivering then shaking your head pondering "for what"?

There is  a poem. by an unknown author I discovered on Kate's site...

Smiling is infectious
You can catch it like the flu.
When someone smiled at me today
I started smiling too.

I passed around the corner
And someone saw my grin.
When he smiled I realized
I’d passed it on to him.

I thought about that smile,
Then I realized it’s worth.
A single smile just like mine
Could travel round the world.

So, if you feel a smile begin,
Don’t leave it undetected,
Let’s start an epidemic quick
And get the world infected!

That in mind please enjoy with my compliments this amazing version of the #1 Christmas anthem of all-time, based on the movie of the same name, It's the Most Wonderful Time featuring Natalie Cole and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

If you'd like the words from the song, go here. If you'd really like to get into the spirit f the season by viewing photos of New York at it's finest from the source of the one featured above go here.

And if you'd like to turn those outsourcing frowns to smiles, talk to us, witness us. We'll   take you on a tour of client sites and and let you taste the FSO experience first-hand where you'll see how different life has become for some of the best known-brands in the world.

Call me personally at 212-204-1193.

Feel the FSO Experience - and ensure everyone around you does too. 

Here's to a wonderful week!

Love Life!

Mitchell D. Weiner
Chief Happiness Officer  

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"The moments of happiness we enjoy take us by surprise. 
It is not that we seize them, but that they seize us.” 
~~ Ashley Montagu
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About the Author:
Welcome to the fastest growing onsite outsourcing company in the nation! Led by Mitch Weiner, co-founder and industry pioneer, FSO is "the" award winning enterprise-wide outsourcing and people solutions firm servicing a multitude of clients across North America.

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